What Is the Best Executive MBA Program for Me?

By Terry Connelly, Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business

Choosing an Executive MBA (EMBA) program turns out to a “multiple choice” question – and a good one. EMBA programs are offered in multiple shapes and sizes, in large universities and small, private and public, non-profit and for-profit, distinguished and ‘not so much’, in-person, online and hybrid – with variable lengths and depths, with little or substantial travel commitments, domestic and overseas or both, expensive and more expensive.

Making the right choice would seem to require an MBA degree in and of itself, in only to sift through all the marketing claims focused on convincing you why each program is “just right for you”!

What does “Executive” really mean?

Let’s instead start with a simple matter of definition – not of the “MBA” part at first, but rather of the key term: “Executive.” Too many prospective students associate that word with an idea of a sort of mid-career shortcut to a Master’s of Business degree that will help them climb to the next, narrower zone up on their career path. They confuse the Executive MBA with something like an “Executive” Golf Course designed for less-experienced (talented?) players. If that’s what you’re looking for in an EMBA program, you know one thing for sure: you’re not ready to pursue an EMBA!

The right understanding of the “Executive” aspect requires a focus on two factors: the folks who will be accepted as your classmate, and a level of effort expectations – of both your fellow students and the teaching faculty – that is commensurate with the knowledge leverage that assures that the “MBA”-part of the program provides for real career advancement.

The term “Executive” envisions a level of responsibility that goes beyond mere management of enterprise affairs to the ability to provide leadership in those affairs.

Learning from Peers

In the right Executive MBA program, you should expect to learn not just from a faculty that has more real-world experience than you have accumulated, but also from your fellow students, whose experience, taken as a whole, should have business knowledge on par with your own. And you should also be prepared to contribute your fair share of challenging, questioning and probing insights as part of the program – or again, you are not ready for a real EMBA!

The right school will select a class by making their admissions criteria clear, compelling and challenging. Years of managerial experience will be important but the most important factor should be ready for leadership roles, as certified by employers. Look favorably on EMBA programs that interview all applicants
that you will interact with and learn from. GGU students tend to be older, so you will most likely find a cohort of individuals who have accrued a certain amount of experience and success.

Look for Road-Tested Faculty

The best Executive MBA programs are ones in which you should expect to learn not just from a faculty that has more experience in enterprise (for-profit or non-profit, governmental or NGO) than you have, rather than just academic pedigrees. Whether full-time professors or part-time adjuncts, they should show a record of leadership involvement that, in stock-trading parlance, would be an “up-tick” to yours and your classmates. If not, give their EMBA program an “Incomplete” grade and look elsewhere. Since the first job of a leader is “define the reality” that your enterprise confronts, you can only learn this skill from real-world sources.

You are far more likely to find the business experience so critical to a good EMBA faculty in a private rather than a public institution, which must prioritize its tenured faculty privileges. All the better if it’s a non-profit school so that your place as a student is not outranked as a priority by the shareholders and the marketing directors.

In the right Executive MBA program, you should expect to learn not just from a faculty that has more real-world experience than you have accumulated, but also from your fellow students, whose experience, taken as a whole, should have business knowledge on par with your own.

Finally, look for diversity in both your classmates and the faculty, in terms of experience, background, race, ethnicity, and gender – as well as foreign as well as domestic home bases. Again, this will help you define reality in the future.

Location, Location, Location

When all the above boxes are checked favorably in your search for the best EMBA program, you may be surprised to find it closer to home or your job than you expected – maybe even near a public transit hub with good nourishment sites around in the neighborhood. You are going to spend many intense hours at school and you don’t want to add any more time getting fed or to and from your destination!

Curriculum

Check to see if the EMBA program itself integrates real-world, present tense problems into the curriculum. You and your classmates will savor the chance to put theory into practice on actual enterprise challenges that have yet to find a solution. The best EMBA programs will readily find enterprises willing to share these opportunities for problem-solving with their students, precisely because those programs will have earned a reputation for being a “cut above” than the others in terms of students, faculty, and ingenuity! And a “cut above” is what you want to be when you get your EMBA, isn’t it?


About Terry Connelly

Terry Connelly is an economic expert and Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University. With more than 30 years experience in investment banking, law and corporate strategy on Wall Street and abroad, Terry analyses the impact of government politics and policies on local, national and international economies, examining the interaction of global financial markets, the U.S. banking industry (and all of its regulatory agencies), the Federal Reserve, domestic employment levels and consumer reactions to the changing economic tides. Terry holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and his professional history includes positions with Ernst & Young Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Graduate School of Business, New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore (corporate, securities and litigation practice in New York and London), global chief of staff at Salomon Brothers investment banking firm and Cowen & Company’s investments, where he served as CEO. In conjunction with Golden Gate University President Dan Angel, Terry co-authored Riptide: The New Normal In Higher Education (2011). Riptide deconstructs the changing landscape of higher education in the face of the for-profit debacle, graduation gridlock, and staggering student debt, and asserts a new, sustainable model for progress. Terry is a board member of the the Public Religion Research Institute, a Washington, DC think tank and polling organization, and the Cardiac Therapy Foundation in Palo Alto, California. Terry lives in Palo Alto with his wife.


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My Advice for Women in Business: Know What You Want and Ask for It!

By Helen Fanucci, ‎Global Windows Sales and Digital Transformation Leader at ‎Microsoft

The most important piece of advice I could give to women hoping to advance their career is to know what you want and ask for it.  On the surface, this may seem obvious and easy. However, asking assumes you know what you want. It also presumes that you’ve built some credibility in your organization so that others want to help you.  As an example of this, some studies have shown that women do not ask for raises as frequently as men do; and when they do ask, they often do not get them.  Globally the gender pay gap is 46% less pay for women. In the U.S. the gap is 20%.

Planning and Goals

The foundation of knowing what you want requires that you’ve taken the time to create a plan and goals for yourself. Your plan should include looking out 6-12 months with detailed actions on what you need to do. It should also include a 5-10 year plan that will be an outline and become clearer and more detailed as time progresses. Your plan should be based on your goals, values, personal priorities, and life situation. It is essential for those who have ambition to define outcomes to measure themselves by.

Your plan and associated goals become the lens through which opportunities and projects are evaluated. When you are given an opportunity, ask yourself: How does this opportunity enable me to achieve the goals I have? If it does not forward your goals, it is not a good opportunity for you at that time. Your plan will also provide a framework for prioritizing projects.

I mentor a woman who grew her salary by 28% in two years (by asking for multiple raises) and defined a new role that she created based on seeing an opportunity that the organization was not capitalizing on.

Connecting with People

As you reflect on what is needed to move your goals forward, you likely will think of individuals to connect with who can help you accelerate achieving your goals. This is where it becomes important to have clarity so you can ask for what you want. Most individuals I’ve managed do not ask for what they want because they have not defined it. As Lewis Carroll famously said: “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.”

Asking for What You Want

If you are asking your manager for a raise, promotion, or have an idea that you believe in and want to pursue, it is important that you are an individual who has delivered value and has built some credibility so that people take you seriously, listen, and are inclined to say yes when you ask.

To do this, deliver on the fundamentals and basic expectations of your role. Look for opportunities to deliver above and beyond what is expected. You are uniquely positioned in your role to see things that those above you and around you cannot see. Make recommendations based on your vantage point. Propose ideas and suggest how things can be done better and more efficiently. If you see a gap that you’d like to fill, define the role and its responsibilities and expectations and then ask to do it.

This really works! I mentor a woman who grew her salary by 28% in two years (by asking for multiple raises) and defined a new role that she created based on seeing an opportunity that the organization was not capitalizing on. She then suggested that she would be an ideal candidate for the role. During a recent reorganization, she got that role.


Special Event

Helen Fanucci will be a panelist at the 5th Annual Women in Leadership event at GGU in October. Join her and other distinguished panelists as they share stories, tips, and insights on how to navigate a successful career. The event is open to the GGU community and the public. Admission to this event is free and refreshments will be provided.

Date: October 25, 2017
Time: 5:30 – 8 p.m.
Location: Golden Gate University, San Francisco [directions]

Agenda:

5:30 – 6:30 pm — Registration begins / networking
6:30 – 7:30 pm — Panel discussion and Q&A
7:30 – 8:00 pm — Post-panel networking

For more information about this event, please visit www.ggu.edu/women-in-leadership.

Get updates and share with friends: #GGUWomen.


About Helen Fanucci

Helen Fanucci leads Windows Enterprise Sales for Microsoft and has held numerous sales and marketing roles at IBM, Apple Computer, and Sun Microsystems in Silicon Valley and London.

Building Leadership and Teamwork Skills at Golden Gate University

Jatin Jaiswal (MBA, Marketing Concentration ’17) made his way from India to Golden Gate University in part to take advantage of San Francisco’s innovative technology environment. He landed an internship at a local start-up called FinTech School where he applies skills he picked up at GGU such as SEO, email marketing, and social media. But he says a big part of his education has been learning how to collaborate with people with different backgrounds and personalities.

“The team exercises in my Team Dynamics and Managerial Analysis class were transformational for me, and I could see other people change too,” he says. The class was taught by Heather Cowan, who has held senior positions at Genentech and Autodesk where she currently serves as ‎Director of Learning and Organization Development. The students were assigned to groups of six with a balance of personality styles as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Each group had to work through a project starting with an informal kickoff meeting and ending with a group decision on a single course of action.

Jaiswal had his turn to lead the group during the project. “As a leader, you have to get the conversation started and keep it going. For example, you have to watch people that are introverted and bring them into the dynamic and be aware of their tendency to be agreeable. You learn to see the other side of a conversation and find out if there is something blocking progress—and then unblock it! I handle situations differently after taking the class. I take more time to think about what I am doing and understand my colleagues better.”

“The class was transformational for me, and I could see other people change too.”

As for the future, Jaiswal sees a huge opportunity presented by the San Francisco Bay Area tech environment for providing specialized consulting services to companies. “My business partner is from the Ukraine, and his culture is different, but we are working together towards a common goal.”

Jaiswal on Networking in San Francisco

“Steve Jobs said that people are there to help you and all you have to do is ask.” In San Francisco, I had coffee with people from Salesforce just by writing them through LinkedIn.  You may not get a job, but it leads to the next thing. San Francisco is a very welcoming city, and you have access to all kinds of companies like Microsoft, Uber, and Tesla.”


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Golden Gate University Ranked #1 in US for Adult Learners for Second Consecutive Year

For the second consecutive year, Washington Monthly ranks Golden Gate University America’s #1 School for Adult Learners in its annual College Guide and Rankings.

How GGU Was Chosen

To compile the rankings, Washington Monthly reviewed data from the Department of Education’s Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) survey, the department’s new College Scorecard database and the College Board’s Annual Survey of Colleges.

The metrics that determined GGU’s rating include:

  • ease of transfer/enrollment
  • flexibility of programs
  • services available for adult learners
  • percent of adult students (age 25+)
  • mean earnings of adult students ten years after entering college
  • loan repayment of adult students five years after entering repayment
  • tuition and fees for in-district students

Read the article in Washington Monthly >>

GGU’s Master of Science in Finance Program Admitted to CFA Institute University Affiliation Program

We are pleased to announce that the Master of Science in Finance (MSF) Program at Golden Gate University has been admitted to the CFA Institute’s University Affiliation Program. The CFA Institute is a worldwide organization that promotes ethics and education in the financial services industry. It awards the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and Certificate in Investment Performance Management (CIPM) designations, and provides continuing education to the industry. Its membership includes over 100,000 Chartered Financial Analysts around the world.

Each year, the CFA Institute conducts a survey on the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in the field of finance, and the results are used to develop the topics covered in the CFA program curriculum. To be accepted into the University Affiliation Program, GGU had to provide documentation that our MS Finance curriculum covers a large majority (at least 70%) of such topics. Membership in the University Affiliation Program signals to employers that the MSF curriculum is closely tied to the practice of financial management, and prepares students for the CFA exams. It also reflects GGU’s ongoing commitment to keep pace with the financial services industry. This affiliation will give GGU funding to award five scholarships per year for students sitting for the CFA exams.

Finance and Economics Department Chairwoman Dr. Andrea Anthony commented: “We plan to leverage this new affiliation to strengthen our current investment course offerings to stay focused on the most relevant tools and topics needed in the investment industry.”

Chartered Financial Analyst® (CFA) is a registered trademark of the CFA Institute.


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Driven to Succeed: Armenian Student Continues Marketing Career in San Francisco

Tsovinar Yenokyan is a student in Golden Gate University’s Master of Science in Marketing Program (’18).


Tsovinar Yenokyan has been driven to succeed from an early age. She started to work at age 16, which was not common in her native country of Armenia, and began what she calls her, “long-lasting relationship with marketing.” Two years later, she took a Brand Manager position at Starcom Mediavest in Armenia. At 21, Tsovinar launched a marketing agency based on forward-thinking “lifestyle” targeting. While earning an MBA at American University of Armenia, she met a classmate and together they opened a bakery and café called “Cupcake Place.”

Tsovinar decided to come to GGU in San Francisco to get a master’s degree in marketing. “I came to San Francisco to get new perspectives, gain more knowledge, and realize my ambitions. San Francisco is a great generator of tech innovation that impacts the entire world. San Francisco, particularly downtown, is a great place to make professional connections and build a career.”

international-armenian-student
Tsovinar outside GGU in downtown San Francisco.

A Real-World Education at Golden Gate University

“I love my school,” Tsovinar says. “GGU has great professors. Most importantly, they are professionals who bring real-life experiences to the class.” For example, her Data Analytics course was taught by Dr. Nabanita Talukdar who has conducted quantitative and qualitative analyses for L’Oreal, Procter & Gamble, and other major companies.

In the Data Analytics class, Tsovinar created a quantitative report focusing on Airbnb units using statistical indicators such as which San Francisco neighborhoods have the highest demand, consumer satisfaction numbers, and rental prices. Through using a programming language called R, Tsovinar and her peer team created a prediction model for hosts to estimate the fair price of their rental properties.

GGU has great professors. Most importantly, they are professionals who bring real-life experiences to the class.

Inspiration in Armenia

Tsovinar credits the launch of her career at 16 to her mother, who was working on becoming a laser physicist until the Soviet Union collapsed. Her mother began a second career as a market developer for Coca-Cola and advanced to become the company’s CEO for Armenia. She then took the job of CEO of Armenia Wine.  “Armenia is famous for world-class wineries and Armenians are probably the most hospitable people in the world; we like to make each person that visits our country or our home feel special. You can ask my boyfriend about Armenian hospitality; he gained eight pounds from my mother’s cooking.”

On Being an International Student

“GGU is a perfect place for international students. Each student has an advisor and mine has been helpful in answering questions about student Visas and my curriculum. San Francisco is a city with its own heart and soul. I love this city. I have never seen such a contrast of people with so many different interests and backgrounds in one place. It’s a warm and welcoming place.”


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San Francisco is the Place to Be for Graduates Looking for a Job

A casual search of LinkedIn uncovers thousands of high-paying tech and business jobs in San Francisco. Shortages in the healthcare management and business analytics fields, combined with rapid growth in the tech sector, have driven abundant work opportunities.

Despite this promising outlook, recent graduates of any field face competition from their peers and those with greater experience. Choosing the right city to start a career can give graduates an edge in finding a great job.

It comes as no surprise that San Francisco has been named the best city in the US for recent graduates to find a job by the highly respected American Institute of Economic Research (AIER). The study looked at a number of factors, including unemployment rate, labor force participation, and how many people worked in emerging industries.

Located in San Francisco’s Financial District, Golden Gate University is situated as an ideal launch pad for graduates looking to advance a business career or break into a new one. GGU’s faculty often make a short walk – some literally across the street – to teach courses. Many currently work for international companies with a worldwide impact such as Google. Direct exposure to working professionals creates valuable networking and mentoring opportunities for students. Golden Gate University’s roots in the Bay Area business community go back more than 120 years, a history that has created a natural pipeline from the classroom to the executive suite.


“San Francisco is a great place to look to for work. There are a lot of magnificent local companies like Uber, Google, Facebook, Salesforce, Apple, Microsoft, Charles & Schwab—and the list goes on. I believe this city has opportunities for everyone, whether a graduate is looking for a career in Marketing, Human Resources, IT, Finance or Accounting. As the technology hub of the world, the number of startups growing every day.”

—Jatin Jaiswal (MBA candidate, ’18)
President Student Government Association


The Best City, Period

AIER also named San Francisco as the best city in the world for higher education when considering both quality of life and practical considerations. The survey found that the factors prospective students value most – the percentage of an educated population and diversity – are hallmarks of what locals call The City. AIER researchers also considered factors such as employment rate (a low 3.1% in San Francisco); arts and entertainment; the presence of science, technology, medical, and engineering workers; biking and walking options; and public transportation. As far as getting around, the new transit station a block from campus and its 4.5-acre rooftop park only adds to the appeal of GGU’s downtown location.

If you are interested in learning about San Francisco’s reputation and position in the business world, we invite you to watch this video with Dr. Gordon Swartz, Dean of GGU’s Ageno School of Business.


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Dr. Marcia Ruben Shares Expertise on Neuroscience and Leadership at Worldwide Event

Dr. Marcia Ruben shared her expertise in two “Ask the Doc” panels at the second-annual Conversational Intelligence® graduation program in New York City on July 22. Ruben is Chair of GGU’s Management Department and the 2016-2018 Recipient of the Russell T. Sharpe Professorship. The event was attended by 380 educators, executive coaches, and business leaders either in person or through streaming video.

Dr. Ruben has given presentations, taught, and written in her Leadership Tangles blog on the link between neuroscience and leadership. She has incorporated the latest scientific knowledge about the biological basis for leadership behavior in five GGU courses: Management and Leadership; Personal Leadership; Teamwork in Organizations; Executive Coaching; and Leadership Theory, Research, and Application. Since being certified in Conversational Intelligence® in 2016, she has embedded some of its concepts and tools in these courses. Ruben says: “Leaders who are aware of the neurochemistry of social interaction are better able to regulate themselves, lower defensiveness, and bring everyone’s best thinking and ideas to the table.”

Left to right: Dr. Richard D. Glaser, Judith Glaser, and Dr. Maria Ruben

Judith Glaser, who created the Conversational Intelligence® certification, invited Dr. Ruben to join the advisory team of her organization and speak at the 2017 graduation ceremony. Dr. Ruben and Dr. Debra Pearce-McCall (who co-authored The Neurochemistry of Power Conversations with Ruben) consulted with Glaser to create a Whole Brain Simulation exercise that took place at the event. Dr. Ruben took a lead role in designing a pre- and post- survey to measure the effectiveness of the simulation. Graduates of the certification program broke into pairs, each representing a part of the brain, and discussed how their part functions and communicates with other brain regions. The group then picked a triggering event – for example, announcing a layoff – and simulated how each part of the brain would react. Participants found the exercise beneficial in learning more about how the brain responds in challenging situations. Ruben says the most important takeaway for participants is learning how to regulate their stress to have more productive conversations.

At the core of all the courses I design or teach are techniques for managers and leaders to create a sense of safety so that they can bring out the best in their people.

—Marcia Ruben, Ph.D.

Dr. Ruben will collaborate on the analysis and write up of the survey she co-designed to access the learning outcomes of the Whole Brain Simulation experience. She is also working on a new and expanded version of her article, Know your Brain, Grow your Leadership, which appears on her Leadership Tangles Blog.

Dr. Ruben is the recipient of the 2016-2018 Russell T. Sharpe Professorship. She is focusing her efforts on identifying the most recent and relevant empirical research to include in GGU’s graduate-level management courses, as well as conducting research that will further enhance the teaching of neuroscience and leadership. Dr. Ruben will be conducting an experiential “Neurowalkaround” with GGU students in December 2017 and gathering data on its effectiveness for current and future leaders.

You can follow Dr. Ruben on Twitter at @TangleDoctor.


About Marcia Ruben, Ph.D.

Marcia Ruben Ph.D. began teaching full-time at Golden Gate University in 2012 and was appointed to the Chair of the Management Department at GGU in 2014. She is president of Ruben Consulting Group, Ltd. and has expertise in executive leadership, team performance, change management, and organizational development. Marcia earned the Certified Management Consultant designation from the Institute of Management Consultants USA in 2002. She is also an accredited executive coach and completed a year-long evidence-based coaching certification program. Marcia earned the Professional Certified Coach (PCC) designation from the International Coach Federation in 2010. Marcia earned her Ph.D. in Human and Organizational Systems from Fielding Graduate University and is currently working on a book based on her doctoral research. She earned an M.A. in Human and Organizational Systems from Fielding Graduate University and an M.S. in Counseling from California State University, Hayward. Marcia graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a B.A. from University of California, Berkeley. She has co-authored several articles that are recognized as thought-leaders in the change management and coaching industry.

Data Surgeon: Andrey Aredakov of GGU’s Master’s in Business Analytics Program


“Would you rather have a surgeon who knows everything from books or surgeon who has actually done your kind of operation?” That is how Andrey Aredakov sums up his teaching philosophy in the master’s degree in business analytics program at GGU. “Knowing a formula for standard deviation doesn’t help much in business. One has to apply it to solve concrete business problems.” For this reason, Aredakov gives his students a data set and challenges them to unlock its potential and communicate the results. In the real-world of business, these insights will give their colleagues what they need to make decisions.

Aredakov works as a Data Analyst at a major search engine company based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Colleagues from various sectors of the company approach him to make sense of an enormous data flow that is expanding by the millisecond. This data flow emerges from user behavior, digital advertising customers, and information from mobile devices. Aredakov presents data results to the various “clients” in the company such as product managers, project managers, and engineers—as well as members of the finance, marketing, and sales teams.

“Storytelling and good communication are part of the job of a business analytics or data analyst professional,” says Aredakov. “This is not about the book knowledge or the statistics. It is about taking out what is unnecessary and telling a kind of story to colleagues that will help them grow the business. The trick is not to create many slides that are full of data charts, but come up with one slide that leaves out everything extraneous and makes finding the solution easier.”

Transforming data into a story liberates a fundamental business asset and gives professionals what they need to improve a company’s product, efficiency, and bottom line. “In today’s world, we have a lot of data and computers that help us compute anything in a short time,” Aredakov says, “but all these numbers require interpretation. Only an expert can provide that.”


Learning R
Aredakov’s students are using R, an open-source statistical tool for business that is dramatically simpler than query languages such as SQL and scripting languages such as Python. You can get results sets, such as the “correlogram” below, in a matter of seconds just by calling the function. The example below correlates car MPG performance (top left box) with various factors such as the number of cylinders (column 2).

About Andrey Aredakov
Andrey Aredakov has worked as a quantity/quality researcher in media, web, and advertising analytics for the last twelve years. His specialties are media and Web analytics, as well as competitive research. Aredakov earned a PhD degree in philosophy at Moscow State University. After working as a data analyst at various companies in Toronto, he moved to San Francisco and joined a major search engine company.


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What Everyone Planning to Get an MBA Should Be Reading, Every Day!


By Terry Connelly, Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University

When I first started the entry-level Wall Street training program at Salomon Brothers, our first instruction was simple: Force yourself to read The Wall Street Journal, end to end, every weekday. If you are planning to pursue Masters of Business Administration (MBA) degree, that advice is still good.

Today’s vast new array of digital media offers the aspiring MBA student a range of choices to keep up with business and economic affairs. Perhaps there are too many choices—so many so that you can focus on the Web sites that fit your personal world-view. And yet..the precious time in your life that you devote getting an MBA offers a tremendous opportunity to challenge your preconceived notions, rather than reinforce them. Learning other points of view will help you as you advance in your career.

Most business magazines are like a day-old sandwich. Web sources that are committed to near real-time news are helpful.

The New York Times (front section): Don’t focus so much on the business pages—those are yesterday’s news. The front pages and even the Op-Eds will offer far more clues as to what will move events and markets and commerce today, and even more so, tomorrow.

The Economist: This British journal is the quickest way to get something all MBAs need: a world view. You will find that The Economist has its own, distinctive, world view. In reading this, you will confront ideas different than your own, early and often, in your schooling. So go ahead and argue with our British friends and figure out your own view of things, and absorb the incredible amount of carefully crafted and thoroughly researched reporting and perspective it provides every week—especially in its in-depth special sections.

Financial Times: While you are in the “British Reading Room” perusing the Economist, also look at Financial Times, which will offer you a perspective on American business, finance, and politics that, as they used to say of Schweppes soda, is “curiously refreshing.” You will want to keep up with Brexit and the doings of the European Community institutions, the Eurozone, German competitors, and French upstarts (Watch that space.).

The Financial Times does not do a bad job covering the Asian region either. You can add Singapore’s Straits Times for that, or better yet, Bloomberg’s Live TV around midnight Pacific Time—when the stock and bond and currency trading day has already started. Speaking of Bloomberg, consider its Businessweek because it is reinventing itself as a more focused journal.

Terry Connelly’s Best Websites for Aspiring MBAs

The New York Times (front section) >>
Financial Times  >>
The Economist  >>
Straits Times (Singapore) >>
Bloomberg’s Live TV >>
Bloomberg’s Businessweek >>
Recode >>
Axios >>

Sidewire >>

Expert Discussion and Commentary

No, I am not going to close with a recommendation of The Washington Post, despite their good information leaks over the decades. Instead, I suggest you get fresh information. Sign up to get the daily online D.C. webcast chats on Axios or Sidewire (the latter of which I have the privilege of contributing to). They limit discussions to those who are experts in their field and summarize current issues that are not discussed in routine press headlines. Their discussions also reveal what to look for during the day and how to stay just a smidge ahead of events related to your industry, your investments, and your general peace of mind.

These sources will help you figure out how to meet the first and mandatory challenge that awaits those who seek to be leaders: defining reality. Most people come to their new jobs with illusions which may have served them well in previous positions but will lead to poor results in their current one. Occasionally, a leader has to shatter the illusions of their team with a cold dose of truth, like the “BI Running Platform” analogy found in more than one business school case study.

Defining reality provides what successful athletes and CEOs alike refer to as acute “situational awareness.” If you want to make the most of your post-MBA moments, use your MBA “free time” to learn how to always know the score and the time left on the clock.


About Terry Connelly

Terry Connelly is an economic expert and dean emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University, California’s fifth largest private university and a nonprofit institution based in San Francisco with award-winning online cyber campus. With more than 30 years experience in investment banking, law and corporate strategy on Wall Street and abroad, Terry analyses the impact of government politics and policies on local, national and international economies, examining the interaction on global financial markets, the U.S. banking industry (and all of its regulatory agencies), the Federal Reserve, domestic employment levels and consumer reactions to the changing economic tides.

Terry holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and his professional history includes positions with Ernst & Young Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Graduate School of Business, New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore (corporate, securities and litigation practice in New York and London), global chief of staff at Salomon Brothers investment banking firm and Cowen & Company’s investments, where he served as CEO. In conjunction with Golden Gate University President Dan Angel, Terry co-authored Riptide: The New Normal In Higher Education (2011). Available on Amazon.com, Riptide deconstructs the changing landscape of higher education in the face of the for-profit debacle, graduation gridlock and staggering student debt, and asserts a new, sustainable model for progress. Terry is a board member of the Public Religion Research Institute, a Washington, DC think tank and polling organization, and the Cardiac Therapy Foundation in Palo Alto, California. Terry lives in Palo Alto with his wife.


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