What Is the Best Executive MBA Program for Me?

By Terry Connelly, Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business

Choosing an Executive MBA (EMBA) program turns out to a “multiple choice” question – and a good one. EMBA programs are offered in multiple shapes and sizes, in large universities and small, private and public, non-profit and for-profit, distinguished and ‘not so much’, in-person, online and hybrid – with variable lengths and depths, with little or substantial travel commitments, domestic and overseas or both, expensive and more expensive.

Making the right choice would seem to require an MBA degree in and of itself, in only to sift through all the marketing claims focused on convincing you why each program is “just right for you”!

What does “Executive” really mean?

Let’s instead start with a simple matter of definition – not of the “MBA” part at first, but rather of the key term: “Executive.” Too many prospective students associate that word with an idea of a sort of mid-career shortcut to a Master’s of Business degree that will help them climb to the next, narrower zone up on their career path. They confuse the Executive MBA with something like an “Executive” Golf Course designed for less-experienced (talented?) players. If that’s what you’re looking for in an EMBA program, you know one thing for sure: you’re not ready to pursue an EMBA!

The right understanding of the “Executive” aspect requires a focus on two factors: the folks who will be accepted as your classmate, and a level of effort expectations – of both your fellow students and the teaching faculty – that is commensurate with the knowledge leverage that assures that the “MBA”-part of the program provides for real career advancement.

The term “Executive” envisions a level of responsibility that goes beyond mere management of enterprise affairs to the ability to provide leadership in those affairs.

Learning from Peers

In the right Executive MBA program, you should expect to learn not just from a faculty that has more real-world experience than you have accumulated, but also from your fellow students, whose experience, taken as a whole, should have business knowledge on par with your own. And you should also be prepared to contribute your fair share of challenging, questioning and probing insights as part of the program – or again, you are not ready for a real EMBA!

The right school will select a class by making their admissions criteria clear, compelling and challenging. Years of managerial experience will be important but the most important factor should be ready for leadership roles, as certified by employers. Look favorably on EMBA programs that interview all applicants
that you will interact with and learn from. GGU students tend to be older, so you will most likely find a cohort of individuals who have accrued a certain amount of experience and success.

Look for Road-Tested Faculty

The best Executive MBA programs are ones in which you should expect to learn not just from a faculty that has more experience in enterprise (for-profit or non-profit, governmental or NGO) than you have, rather than just academic pedigrees. Whether full-time professors or part-time adjuncts, they should show a record of leadership involvement that, in stock-trading parlance, would be an “up-tick” to yours and your classmates. If not, give their EMBA program an “Incomplete” grade and look elsewhere. Since the first job of a leader is “define the reality” that your enterprise confronts, you can only learn this skill from real-world sources.

You are far more likely to find the business experience so critical to a good EMBA faculty in a private rather than a public institution, which must prioritize its tenured faculty privileges. All the better if it’s a non-profit school so that your place as a student is not outranked as a priority by the shareholders and the marketing directors.

In the right Executive MBA program, you should expect to learn not just from a faculty that has more real-world experience than you have accumulated, but also from your fellow students, whose experience, taken as a whole, should have business knowledge on par with your own.

Finally, look for diversity in both your classmates and the faculty, in terms of experience, background, race, ethnicity, and gender – as well as foreign as well as domestic home bases. Again, this will help you define reality in the future.

Location, Location, Location

When all the above boxes are checked favorably in your search for the best EMBA program, you may be surprised to find it closer to home or your job than you expected – maybe even near a public transit hub with good nourishment sites around in the neighborhood. You are going to spend many intense hours at school and you don’t want to add any more time getting fed or to and from your destination!

Curriculum

Check to see if the EMBA program itself integrates real-world, present tense problems into the curriculum. You and your classmates will savor the chance to put theory into practice on actual enterprise challenges that have yet to find a solution. The best EMBA programs will readily find enterprises willing to share these opportunities for problem-solving with their students, precisely because those programs will have earned a reputation for being a “cut above” than the others in terms of students, faculty, and ingenuity! And a “cut above” is what you want to be when you get your EMBA, isn’t it?


About Terry Connelly

Terry Connelly is an economic expert and Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University. With more than 30 years experience in investment banking, law and corporate strategy on Wall Street and abroad, Terry analyses the impact of government politics and policies on local, national and international economies, examining the interaction of global financial markets, the U.S. banking industry (and all of its regulatory agencies), the Federal Reserve, domestic employment levels and consumer reactions to the changing economic tides. Terry holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and his professional history includes positions with Ernst & Young Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Graduate School of Business, New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore (corporate, securities and litigation practice in New York and London), global chief of staff at Salomon Brothers investment banking firm and Cowen & Company’s investments, where he served as CEO. In conjunction with Golden Gate University President Dan Angel, Terry co-authored Riptide: The New Normal In Higher Education (2011). Riptide deconstructs the changing landscape of higher education in the face of the for-profit debacle, graduation gridlock, and staggering student debt, and asserts a new, sustainable model for progress. Terry is a board member of the the Public Religion Research Institute, a Washington, DC think tank and polling organization, and the Cardiac Therapy Foundation in Palo Alto, California. Terry lives in Palo Alto with his wife.


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Under Every GOP Plan to Replace Obamacare, Your Employer Will Be Free to Terminate Your Health Insurance: Did You Vote for That?

By Terry Connelly, Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business

Employer-based health insurance has been a mainstay of the American economic scene since World War II, when it provided an added benefit for workers denied any increase in wages to match their wartime productivity by Federal wage-price controls. And it is at risk of disappearing without much, if any, public debate. For decades it was provided on a voluntary basis, as a product of employer-employee bargaining and job market forces.

The Affordable Care Act signed by President Obama made such coverage mandatory for most enterprises in the US except those with fewer than 50 full-time employees. The Act also specifies the required core elements of such coverage in line with the essential insurance coverage set for the Obamacare Exchanges. It has been a central promise of the Republican Party to end the employer mandate (as well as the individual mandate to purchase some form of insurance). The GOP has made that promise a core part of every form of legislation they have on offer to repeal President Obama’s signature legislation.

Yet, the working assumption of the media seems to be that most large-scale employers would not take advantage of the opportunity to terminate the health insurance benefits of their employees. Even the Democrats have not raised the issue of folks losing their workplace health care policies under the GOP plans, presumably because of the same lazy assumption. But these assumptions fly in the face of basic economic consideration that should lead any sensate CFO to put pencil to paper and “go figure.”

First of all, there are no wage/price controls in place today that would prevent them from giving employees a raise in their pay packet in exchange for ending the insurance benefit. Both are deductible business expenses under the Federal and state income tax laws. Indeed, the only threat on the horizon in terms of benefits is the risk that some health insurance plans may be so generous as to lose part of their tax deductibility!

This trade-off could well be a win-win for employees, especially at the lower segments of the national pay scale, who could buy health insurance on the private market using their expanded paychecks together with both the GOP expansion of tax-advantaged, expanded Health Savings Accounts and Federal premium support subsidies (both part of the GOP proposals to replace current Obamacare tax credits).

If any state were to take advantage of GOP proposal to waive essential insurance benefits mandated by Obamacare on its Exchanges and the individual market…all employers nationwide would be immediately authorized by law to drop their employer coverage down to this new “lowest common denominator” range of coverage.

Replacing workplace-based health insurance policies and forcing the entire US employee base to enter the individual marketplace could have the benefit of radically reducing premiums for most insured families as a result of the massive influx of basically healthy workers to that market which is now gravely tilted to the sick and people with pre-existing conditions (and let’s remember, a pre-existing condition before Obamacare included not just cancer, diabetes, and heart disease, but also simply having ovaries or just having once taken a prescription antacid).

If CFOs discover the magic of replacing rapidly escalating health insurance costs with much more controllable pay increases and letting the US taxpayer foot the bill through the GOP’s federal insurance tax breaks and subsidies, surely employees’ personal contributions to health insurance payments would quickly be made tax deductible by any sensate Congress. (And why not: why should such costs be deductible if paid by an employer, but not if paid by employees if there is no longer an available employer-based plan in their workplace?)

It would be one thing if this rosy transition scenario would be worked out in advance; however, that is hardly the likely base case of what would happen if any of the GOP replacement plans were to be enacted and signed by President Trump. It is much more likely that the first wave of employee insurance terminations would come from small scale, non-unionized “mom and pop” businesses and non-profit entities. Given their vociferous opposition to the mandate all along, they will logically stop providing employee health insurance as soon as the ink is dry on
Trump’s signature.

Remember that as we get closer to businesses of 500 or so employees, we would be dealing with a very big source of jobs in America in an aggregate sense. So it is no wonder that the CBO has estimated that millions would lose their employer-based insurance in the early years following enactment of the GOP proposals. At the same time, there will be rolling chaos as other millions lose their Medicaid coverage and flood the emergency rooms, which are now increasingly staffed by high-cost outsourcing firms. Separate from a hospital’s doctor and nursing workforce, these firms are known for laying the highest maximum ER charges onto working poor patients, thus forcing many thousands into additional medically induced bankruptcies.

This outcome, in turn, would bring increased calls for higher Federal insurance subsidies which will only make it more attractive for major corporate CFOs, CEOs and boards to begin thinking the unthinkable about “repealing” corporate insurance benefit expenses and “replacing” them with equally or even more fully deductible pay increases. Nobody in media is doing such scenario analyses now, in part because they are not paying close enough attention to the CBO scoring of the GOP bill beyond the headline coverage loss numbers largely due to the obvious cutbacks to Medicaid coverage.

The media is also not paying a lot of attention to another aspect of certain GOP proposals that would have another profound effect on employer-based health insurance. If any state were to take advantage of GOP proposal to waive essential insurance benefits mandated by Obamacare on its Exchanges and the individual market — like maternity care, mental health, drug rehab or cancer care — all employers nationwide would be immediately authorized by law to drop their employer coverage down to this new “lowest common denominator” range of coverage, regardless of how those with pre-existing conditions would be left to the mercy of the marketplace, and that Obamacare’s ban on lifetime limits of coverage would likewise disappear also for those conditions.

This sneak attack on employer-based insurance may or may not make it into whatever the GOP manages to pass in Congress or adopt by regulation, if they pass anything at all. But it is worth paying far more attention to than the mainstream media (perhaps cowed by President Trump’s incessant attacks on their bias and “fake news” reports) is willing to report. As Arthur Miller wrote in Death of a Salesman: “Attention must be paid.” — especially when we are confronting the possibility of a slow, insidious attack on workplace health insurance.

This article appeared on the Huffiington Post on July 27, 2017.


About Terry Connelly

Terry Connelly is an economic expert and Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University. With more than 30 years experience in investment banking, law and corporate strategy on Wall Street and abroad, Terry analyses the impact of government politics and policies on local, national and international economies, examining the interaction of global financial markets, the U.S. banking industry (and all of its regulatory agencies), the Federal Reserve, domestic employment levels and consumer reactions to the changing economic tides. Terry holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and his professional history includes positions with Ernst & Young Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Graduate School of Business, New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore (corporate, securities and litigation practice in New York and London), global chief of staff at Salomon Brothers investment banking firm and Cowen & Company’s investments, where he served as CEO. In conjunction with Golden Gate University President Dan Angel, Terry co-authored Riptide: The New Normal In Higher Education (2011). Riptide deconstructs the changing landscape of higher education in the face of the for-profit debacle, graduation gridlock and staggering student debt, and asserts a new, sustainable model for progress. Terry is a board member of the the Public Religion Research Institute, a Washington, DC think tank and polling organization, and the Cardiac Therapy Foundation in Palo Alto, California. Terry lives in Palo Alto with his wife.

What Everyone Planning to Get an MBA Should Be Reading, Every Day!


By Terry Connelly, Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University

When I first started the entry-level Wall Street training program at Salomon Brothers, our first instruction was simple: Force yourself to read The Wall Street Journal, end to end, every weekday. If you are planning to pursue Masters of Business Administration (MBA) degree, that advice is still good.

Today’s vast new array of digital media offers the aspiring MBA student a range of choices to keep up with business and economic affairs. Perhaps there are too many choices—so many so that you can focus on the Web sites that fit your personal world-view. And yet..the precious time in your life that you devote getting an MBA offers a tremendous opportunity to challenge your preconceived notions, rather than reinforce them. Learning other points of view will help you as you advance in your career.

Most business magazines are like a day-old sandwich. Web sources that are committed to near real-time news are helpful.

The New York Times (front section): Don’t focus so much on the business pages—those are yesterday’s news. The front pages and even the Op-Eds will offer far more clues as to what will move events and markets and commerce today, and even more so, tomorrow.

The Economist: This British journal is the quickest way to get something all MBAs need: a world view. You will find that The Economist has its own, distinctive, world view. In reading this, you will confront ideas different than your own, early and often, in your schooling. So go ahead and argue with our British friends and figure out your own view of things, and absorb the incredible amount of carefully crafted and thoroughly researched reporting and perspective it provides every week—especially in its in-depth special sections.

Financial Times: While you are in the “British Reading Room” perusing the Economist, also look at Financial Times, which will offer you a perspective on American business, finance, and politics that, as they used to say of Schweppes soda, is “curiously refreshing.” You will want to keep up with Brexit and the doings of the European Community institutions, the Eurozone, German competitors, and French upstarts (Watch that space.).

The Financial Times does not do a bad job covering the Asian region either. You can add Singapore’s Straits Times for that, or better yet, Bloomberg’s Live TV around midnight Pacific Time—when the stock and bond and currency trading day has already started. Speaking of Bloomberg, consider its Businessweek because it is reinventing itself as a more focused journal.

Terry Connelly’s Best Websites for Aspiring MBAs

The New York Times (front section) >>
Financial Times  >>
The Economist  >>
Straits Times (Singapore) >>
Bloomberg’s Live TV >>
Bloomberg’s Businessweek >>
Recode >>
Axios >>

Sidewire >>

Expert Discussion and Commentary

No, I am not going to close with a recommendation of The Washington Post, despite their good information leaks over the decades. Instead, I suggest you get fresh information. Sign up to get the daily online D.C. webcast chats on Axios or Sidewire (the latter of which I have the privilege of contributing to). They limit discussions to those who are experts in their field and summarize current issues that are not discussed in routine press headlines. Their discussions also reveal what to look for during the day and how to stay just a smidge ahead of events related to your industry, your investments, and your general peace of mind.

These sources will help you figure out how to meet the first and mandatory challenge that awaits those who seek to be leaders: defining reality. Most people come to their new jobs with illusions which may have served them well in previous positions but will lead to poor results in their current one. Occasionally, a leader has to shatter the illusions of their team with a cold dose of truth, like the “BI Running Platform” analogy found in more than one business school case study.

Defining reality provides what successful athletes and CEOs alike refer to as acute “situational awareness.” If you want to make the most of your post-MBA moments, use your MBA “free time” to learn how to always know the score and the time left on the clock.


About Terry Connelly

Terry Connelly is an economic expert and dean emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University, California’s fifth largest private university and a nonprofit institution based in San Francisco with award-winning online cyber campus. With more than 30 years experience in investment banking, law and corporate strategy on Wall Street and abroad, Terry analyses the impact of government politics and policies on local, national and international economies, examining the interaction on global financial markets, the U.S. banking industry (and all of its regulatory agencies), the Federal Reserve, domestic employment levels and consumer reactions to the changing economic tides.

Terry holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and his professional history includes positions with Ernst & Young Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Graduate School of Business, New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore (corporate, securities and litigation practice in New York and London), global chief of staff at Salomon Brothers investment banking firm and Cowen & Company’s investments, where he served as CEO. In conjunction with Golden Gate University President Dan Angel, Terry co-authored Riptide: The New Normal In Higher Education (2011). Available on Amazon.com, Riptide deconstructs the changing landscape of higher education in the face of the for-profit debacle, graduation gridlock and staggering student debt, and asserts a new, sustainable model for progress. Terry is a board member of the Public Religion Research Institute, a Washington, DC think tank and polling organization, and the Cardiac Therapy Foundation in Palo Alto, California. Terry lives in Palo Alto with his wife.


Request information about Golden Gate University’s MBA program >>

Let’s Be Careful with All the Violence Threats by Public Officials


By Terry Connelly, Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business

I once professed fright at the loose talk about assassination of President Obama among various far right zealots. This reached probably a “peak” (or low) when radio firebrand Michael Savage and major Trump supporter referred to the President as “a rabid dog that should be dealt with accordingly” – a direct quote which I personally heard. Somehow this felonious jerk was awarded a place in the National Radio Hall of Fame about the same time he said that.

It all reminded me of what many of us lived through during the JFK Administration: threats against President Kennedy emanating from the “alt-right:’ of those days, especially folks associated with the John Birch Society and General Edwin Walker. Citizens then got used to the talk, flyers and Kennedy hate signs at rallies, but it all culminated in the actual Presidential assassination of November 22, 1963 in the Birch/Walker hotbed of Texas, followed by a whole lot of short-lived hand-wringing about all the violent talk we had tolerated –- and two more major political assassinations of the President’s brother and Dr. Martin Luther King just a few years later.

Now the shoe seems to be on the other foot, as conservative political figures – egged-on by the same far-right advocates and radio hosts that called on folks to use their ‘second Amendment rights” against the Obama administration – are aiming their own assassination threats against members of the news media, and in one recent case actually taking violent action against an “irritating” reporter. Do we really want to go down this dangerous road again?

There were as we recall numerous threats and actions of violence against news media at Trump campaign rallies and even at media events: a well-known Univision anchor and reporter, Jorge Ramos, was physically removed from a press conference. An accredited reporter from a right-wing journal, Michelle Fields, was jostled a Trump campaign manager (and then disowned by her employer when she complained). News media were kept in a pen and routinely taunted and threatened by Trump supporters at rallies, with occasional encouragement from the candidate himself. The campaign passed these eye-witnessed events as fake news or just a kind of harmless fun, effectively trying to create a false equivalence with the sarcastic portrayals on Saturday Night Live of Trump, Clinton and lately Sean Spicer, the Press Secretary).

Much more recently, as leaks published in the media of aspects of the FBI’s investigation of Russian involvement in the 2016 election and possible Trump collusion in those efforts have enraged President Trump as well as his staff and supporters, a renewed pattern of purportedly “joking” threats of harm to members of the news media have emerged at the highest levels. The new Homeland Security Chief John Kelly was heard suggesting to the President that a ceremonial sword given to Trump at a Coast Guard graduation celebration be used on the press, with Trump audibly concurring. Then the Governor of Texas, a major Trump supporter, at a ceremony relating to that’s Sate’s decision to reduce the cost of gun carry permits from $70 to $40 brandished his own bullet-riddled gun target sheet and saying he would carry it around in case he meets up with reporters.. Recently, GOP candidate Greg Gianforte (pictured above) taking offense at an aggressive media question about health insurance policy at a campaign event and body-slamming the reporter to the ground, breaking his glasses and sending him to the hospital the day before election day.

The fact that he won anyway is neither surprising – given extensive early voting, or unexpected given the state strong GOP leanings. But the disturbing fact is that that some supporters in Montana and elsewhere praised Gianforte’s actions, suggesting he need not apologize, and that the newsperson seemed to have had it coming per Rush Limbaugh, who “condemned’ the attack tongue in cheek. So much for the First Amendment protection that makes you a living, Rush!

Likewise, even the respected conservative columnist David Brooks, chose to “give him a pass” for just apologizing (as Brooks shamefully did on PBS NewsHour on Friday, May 26). Is Brooks suggesting that there should be a double criminal law standard for assaulting reporters by white, rich Republicans – they get off with an apology, while a black man in America body-slams anybody in full view most likely will go to jail (at the very least). While this fact might suggest only that latent racism is surely a reality, David Brooks ought to know better. When he starts condoning violence against the media, we really are heading back down the slippery slope of that lead to the 60’s assassination of political figures. Recall all these actions occurred after our new President called the news media an “enemy of the people” .

And yes, it is appropriate to use the term “assassination” in respect to the threats against the news media, because assassinations are by definition politically motivated killings, and surely that shoe fits snugly in these recent cases – jokes or not jokes. It all started with jokes in the 60’s.


About Terry Connelly

Terry Connelly is an economic expert and Dean Emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University. With more than 30 years experience in investment banking, law and corporate strategy on Wall Street and abroad, Terry analyses the impact of government politics and policies on local, national and international economies, examining the interaction of global financial markets, the U.S. banking industry (and all of its regulatory agencies), the Federal Reserve, domestic employment levels and consumer reactions to the changing economic tides. Terry holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and his professional history includes positions with Ernst & Young Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Graduate School of Business, New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore (corporate, securities and litigation practice in New York and London), global chief of staff at Salomon Brothers investment banking firm and Cowen & Company’s investments, where he served as CEO. In conjunction with Golden Gate University President Dan Angel, Terry co-authored Riptide: The New Normal In Higher Education (2011). Riptide deconstructs the changing landscape of higher education in the face of the for-profit debacle, graduation gridlock and staggering student debt, and asserts a new, sustainable model for progress. Terry is a board member of the the Public Religion Research Institute, a Washington, DC think tank and polling organization, and the Cardiac Therapy Foundation in Palo Alto, California. Terry lives in Palo Alto with his wife.

What the House GOP Isn’t Telling You About Their Obamacare Repeal Bill: “If you like your workplace health care plan, you probably can’t keep it!”

Absent from the half-time celebration at the White House of the one-vote passage of the American Health Care Act (“ACHA”) by the GOP-controlled House of Representatives, there was many statements about both premiums and deductibles going down and pre-existing condition coverage continuing as a result of this legislation. But no one in the Rose Garden or the Rotunda of the Capitol building was heard to utter the famous magic words associated with the ObamaCare passage from Day One: ‘If you like the health plan you have now, you can keep it!”

Certainly, it has been clear enough for a while that, under ACHA, if you are on Medicaid, you are looking at an $880 billion in overall funding reduction, so million of those depending on Medicaid coverage will lose at least part of that.

The same result applies for those who purchase policies on the ObamaCare Exchanges with direct subsidies from the Federal treasury because those subsidies will be replaced by substantially lesser advanced tax credits that will, therefore, force choices for less generous coverage.

In addition, if your state chooses to waive the Federal requirement that your individual (ie non-workplace) market plan include ten “essential” coverage elements—like maternity and infant care, mental health, prescription drugs, hospitalization)—you will lose whatever benefits are waived no matter what your pay. And there will be even greater coverage degradation of existing policies if protections for those with a pre-existing medical condition (Here’s a list of them.) are waived by your state and you somehow lose coverage for over 63 days, and in any event whatever coverage of your condition is not waived will cost a lot more.

But nobody on the GOP side has acknowledged that the famous “you can keep it” phrase regarding your family’s current health insurance policy quite possibly will no longer apply to the 160 million persons (nearly 50% of the marketplace) currently receiving their health care coverage through plans provided by their employers. How did this happen without virtually any public notice of this element of the GOP plan until the very morning it passed?

It should have been clear enough that at least those who work in many small businesses across America and get their health insurance though their employer would be at risk to losing coverage. The late-April revisions to the AHCA offering states the options to waive essential benefits and pre-existing condition protection against price discrimination would apply not only to the ObamaCare Exchange and individual marketplace but also to the small group market relevant to firms with 50-100 employees or less, depending on the relevant state regulations.

But even employees of our largest public and private companies could have their current coverage limited or eliminated, as the Wall Street Journal pointed out on the morning the House voted.  Under the ObamaCare rules now, a big company can choose the benefit package of any state to apply to its employees in all states—a rule that hardly matters while all policies are required to provide the ten essential benefits.

If just one state (as Wisconsin’s governor has already suggested he would consider) chooses to pursue the coverage waivers under the new AHCA, a big company could simply impose this ‘lowest common insurance denominator” of coverage to all its US employees, unless the current rules are changed (but the ACHA leaves them place). As a further result, the Obamacare ban on lifetime caps on insurance benefits would also be undercut for any insurance coverage remaining after the waivers take effect.  If you still think the GOP plan won’t affect you because you have a job with insurance, think again.

Neither the GOP generally, Speaker Ryan and his leadership team, nor President Trump ever campaigned on the platform to “repeal and replace your workplace healthcare policies.”  It surely seems that somebody’s got some explaining to do: the town hall meetings during the current Congressional recess might be a good place to start.

About Terry Connelly

terry-connellyTerry Connelly is an economic expert and dean emeritus of the Ageno School of Business at Golden Gate University, California’s fifth largest private university and a nonprofit institution based in San Francisco with award-winning online cyber campus. With more than 30 years experience in investment banking, law and corporate strategy on Wall Street and abroad, Terry analyses the impact of government politics and policies on local, national and international economies, examining the interaction of global financial markets, the U.S. banking industry (and all of its regulatory agencies), the Federal Reserve, domestic employment levels and consumer reactions to the changing economic tides.

Terry holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and his professional history includes positions with Ernst & Young Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Graduate School of Business, New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore (corporate, securities and litigation practice in New York and London), global chief of staff at Salomon Brothers investment banking firm and Cowen & Company’s investments, where he served as CEO. In conjunction with Golden Gate University President Dan Angel, Terry co-authored Riptide: The New Normal In Higher Education (2011). Riptide deconstructs the changing landscape of higher education in the face of the for-profit debacle, graduation gridlock and staggering student debt, and asserts a new, sustainable model for progress. Terry is a board member of the the Public Religion Research Institute, a Washington, DC think tank and polling organization, and the Cardiac Therapy Foundation in Palo Alto, California. Terry lives in Palo Alto with his wife.